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Toronto, ON, M6J 1Y2

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Wallace MacAskill

House with the Evening Tide by Wallace MacAskill

$1,000
Size
Stephen Bulger Gallery ( Toronto, ON)
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  • Artwork Info
  • About the Artist
  • circa 1935
    Gelatin silver print mounted to period board
    Signed and titled, in pencil, au mount recto
    Titled, dated, and annotated with artist's name, in ink, on label, adhered, au mount verso
    Printed circa 1935
    Unframed

  • Professional photographer Wallace Robinson MacAskill (1887-1956) was born in St. Peters, Cape Breton County, N.S. He graduated from the Wade School of Photography in New York in 1907 and opened photographic studios in St. Peters and then Glace Bay before moving to Halifax in 1915. There, he worked for official military photographer W.G. MacLaughlan, and as a printer at Elite Studios from 1916 to 1919. Between 1920 and 1929 he was a photographer with Commercial Photo Service. In 1929, the Bluenose stamp based on his photograph was issued, and he opened a business under his own name on Barrington Street in Halifax.

    MacAskill became internationally known as a marine photographer and his photographs were used extensively for advertising by the Nova Scotia government. MacAskill published two books, Out of Halifax (1937) and Lure of the Sea (1951). A number of his photographs were also published in Schooner Bluenose by Andrew Merkel (1948). MacAskill was the recipient of numerous awards for his achievements in both photography and yachting, including the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron's Prince of Wales Cup (1932-1934, 1938), Thunderbird Crest Award for marine photography, and fellowship from the Photographers Society of America. He died at his home, "Brigadoon", in Ferguson Cove on 25 January 1956.

    Source:  Nova Scotia Archives