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Pedro E. Guerrero

Taliesin West by Pedro E. Guerrero

$3,750
Size
Stephen Bulger Gallery ( Toronto, ON)
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  • Artwork Info
  • About the Artist
  • About this Photograph
  • 1940
    Gelatin silver print
    Signed, titled, dated, and editioned, in ink, au recto; signed, in pencil, titled, and dated, in ink, artist copyright stamp, in ink, au verso
    Edition of 50 (#2/50)
    Printed in 1980
    Unframed

  • Pedro E. Guerrero (1917-2012) was a freelance photographer whose early interaction with Frank Lloyd Wright led to a 20 year collaboration, and established a reputation for Guerrero as one of the most renowned architectural photographers of the 20th century. Guerrero spent an entire year photographing Wright’s homes, Taliesin, and Taliesin West, before enlisting in the US Army in 1941 as a photo officer during WWII. Guerrero returned to the US in 1945, and from his base in New York City he continued to document the master’s work, recording the changes at Wright’s personal homes. Over seven decades, Guerrero travelled the world for major New York publications including House and Garden, House Beautiful, Harper’s Bazaar, and Architectural Forum. In addition to documenting the work of architects Marcel Breuer, Philip Johnson, and Edward Durell Stone, Guerrero also photographed visual artists such as Alexander Calder and Louise Nevelson.

  • This photograph of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Arizona home was taken soon after Guerrero met the famed architect. Built and added to over a number of years, Wright’s winter residence was the location of his school, and is now home to his Foundation. Located in the desert outside of Phoenix, Wright’s symbol for Taliesin West was inspired by Native American petroglyphs discovered near the site by his family soon after their arrival. Wright’s students, one of whom might be the figure documented in this photograph, accomplished much of the work on the site. The figure, captured in an  heroic manner, demonstrates the detailed focus this project demanded, as well as suggesting the way in which the building both complemented and conformed to its surroundings.